2018
by Asociación Armonía

Sustainable protection of breeding habitat of the Critically Endangered Blue-throated Macaw (Ara glaucogularis) in Bolivia.

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Community managed nature protection Species protection
2018
by Asociación Armonía

Sustainable protection of breeding habitat of the Critically Endangered Blue-throated Macaw (Ara glaucogularis) in Bolivia.

The aim of the project is to sustainable protect the Blue-throated Macaw breeding habitat within a new protected nature reserve. The 681 Ha reserve will be purchased in August 2018 to protect the most important nesting area of the Critically Endangered Blue-throated Macaw in Bolivia. Armonía’s successful nest box program has produced over 70 chicks fledge from this forested area, demonstrating the importance of this site. By educating local communities of the importance of the Blue-throated Macaw, and by establishing low-impact tourism and ranching within the reserve, we will be able to ensure its protection forever.

 

The creation of this reserve with an interpretation centre will allow communities and indigenous people to see the Blue-throated Macaw up close for the first time. We will conduct planned school and community trips to the reserve to educate them on the Blue-throated Macaw in the wild and our nest box activities to save the bird from extinction. We will create a management plan to sustainably manage the reserve. The plan will initiate a low-impact ranching and tourism program, involving local communities in protection, education and management activities as well as opening a market for selling handicrafts to tourists.

Name organisation:
Asociación Armonía
Start date:
01-08-2018
Funding:
€10000
Country/Territory:
Bolivia
Name organisation:
Asociación Armonía
Start date:
01-08-2018
Funding:
€10000
Country/Territory:
Bolivia Africa

Long-term results Armonía’s next box program

Our 14-year nest box program showed on average a 31% egg loss (infertile eggs, damaged eggs or predated eggs) and an 11% mortality rate of hatched chicks. Chicks that died in the nest boxes were the smallest chicks often hatched long after the oldest individuals. Little information is available on the survival rate of the fledged birds, but the return of ringed individuals during the 2017-2018 and the 2018-2019 breeding season is a promising indicator demonstrating the success of this program.