2020
by Wild Fauna Foundation

Local Community Actions to Safeguard the Critically Endangered White-thighed Colobus in the Boaben Fiema Monkey Sanctuary, Ghana

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Community managed nature protection Ecosystem protection Species protection
2020
by Wild Fauna Foundation

Local Community Actions to Safeguard the Critically Endangered White-thighed Colobus in the Boaben Fiema Monkey Sanctuary, Ghana

The project will contribute to community-based management efforts and conservation of the Boabeng-Fiema monkey sanctuary through human capacity development and habitat management. Specifically, the project will;

  1. Train selected field guides to conduct independent inventories to monitor primates populations and movement
  2. Assess, profile and plant indigenous tree species to restore degraded habitats in the catchment area
  3. Institute strict ecotourism protocols to increase tourism experience while reducing impacts of human intrusion on species health and habitat.

Ten field guards will be trained and equipped with data collection tools to collect population and movement data in their line of work. This will help build a consolidated baseline data for future management and conservation programmes. Through a rapid assessment and survey, core habitat and degraded areas of the White-thighed Colobus monkey will be identified, demarcated and planted through community and stakeholder’s support. Through concerted stakeholders deliberations and consultative meetings, awareness and behavioural change programmes will be rolled out to facilitate adoption of full scale ecotourism protocols thereby restructuring and retooling available facilities and services towards developing a circular economy.

Name organisation:
Wild Fauna Foundation
Start date:
01-06-2020
Funding:
€7990
Country/Territory:
Ghana
Name organisation:
Wild Fauna Foundation
Start date:
01-06-2020
Funding:
€7990
Country/Territory:
Ghana Africa

White-thighed Colobus and Mona monkeys (“children of the gods”)

Over the years, Boabeng and Fiema communities have used traditional and cultural norms, myths and taboos to co-exist with the Critically endangered and endemic White-thighed Colobus and Mona monkeys (revered as “children of the gods”) such that, dead monkeys are buried with elaborate rituals akin to those of humans. Substantial evidence suggests steady increase in monkey populations, such that, troops are now migrating to nearby community forests (7 communities confirmed), there is no available consolidated data to proof this trend. Large tourists’ numbers and current tourism activities gravelly threaten the quality of forest habitat in the area.